Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Per Finne, Wood tools
Per Finne, Wood tools
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light

Strong collection of housewares kitchen products from eight young Norwegian designers is shown at DesignTide in Tokyo until 4 November.

Beautifully formed and executed, all the products balance between traditional and contemporary modern lifestyle. Smooth knifes by Petter Skogstad or Per Finne are modern take on traditional Norwegian as well as Japanese culture. Objects such as Skogstad's Tue cast iron trivet or Kristine Five Melvær's Liquid lights reinterpreting traditional still life motives in kitchen define new kitchen landscape with poetry and abstraction.

Another great products inspired by tradition and everyday life include Anderssen & Voll's Tuomatu cooking top made out of marble or Kristine Bjaadal's Siska French press coffee maker combining porcelain, cork, wood and leather.

Great selection of designers plus original creative theme have created beautiful series of user friendly products under the collective exhibition FoodWork.

Some information from designers:

As the title indicates, the topic of the project is food: storage, preparation, presen­tation, and eating. These objects spring out of simple and ordinary, yet es­sential and vital, actions that tie people together across cultural differences. The objects are designed for everyday situations in Norway – they are Norwegian. How­ever, we have been inspired by Japanese culture – or rather, by our particular understand­ing of Japanese culture. In other words: we have at­tempted to make Norwegian objects that could also be relevant to Japanese living. Our goal is to draw inspiration and knowledge from how our work is experienced in Tokyo.