Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, Splashing Water sconce for the opening gala of the Robertson Boulevard studios, 1956
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Tony Duquette, California Sunburst sconce, 1964
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
Paul Laszlo, sconces, 1940s
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953
William Haines, Ice Crystals sconce for the May house, 1953

Californian decorative design of the 1940s - 1960s is one big theatre. Spectacular theatrical style of the three prominent decorators from this period is seen on these sconces too.

And why theatre? The design of this significant movement in the modern American design is based on visual effects, emotions, as well as theatrical feelings and historicism. One of the decorators here presented is also the theater, film and set designer and scenographer. Tony Duquette (1914 - 1999) is the true legend. His fantastical decorative style is represented in these two beautiful decorative sconces too. French classical style of the 17th century goes modern.

One of the collaborators of Duquette was William Haines (1900 - 1973), movie star in the 1920s became famous interior designer in 1930s. His work from the following postwar years is synonymous for the luxury style of the Californian movie society. This Ice Crystals sconce is made out of faceted pieces of acrylic material creating whole abstract lightning sculpture.

More classicist attitude to design is seen in the 1940s sconce design by architect and designer Paul Laszlo (1900 - 1993), who became also very popular decorator for the richest in the postwar Los Angeles.

On these designs you can see some of the main features of the Californian decorative design scene of this period.