Again in the full work back from beautiful landscape of Italian coastline of Liguria, where we have prepared materials for our upcoming special issue OKOLO Liguria coming out this autumn.

Stay tuned and see our Liguria adventures and news about our upcoming magazine.

The biggest thanks to Fulvio Ferrari and his family for support and our pop-up office in his house.


OKOLO team is heading to Liguria, Italian region full of sun, sea, beaches and wonderful modernist architecture.

During our one week visit we will prepare material for our next special Liguria issue of OKOLO magazine coming out this autumn.

We are very looking forward to see forgotten organic masterpieces by Mario Galvagni (picture above) and much more.

Stay tuned and will be updated about the project!


Max Ernst, Chéri bibi, 1973
Max Ernst, Chéri bibi, 1973
Max Ernst, Tête Triangle brooch
Max Ernst, Tête Triangle brooch
Gio Ponti, Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Ex voto for the Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Ex voto for the Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978

Fascination of the human face in the work of two big masters of the last century.

Surrealist Max Ernst (1891 – 1976) and designer and architect Gio Ponti (1891 - 1979) represent most important persons in their disciplines. Both were born in the same year of 1891 and both lived almost the same amount of years.

In their late work we can see preoccupation of the human face. Max Ernst created series of paintings of the naive yet anxious simple faces. Here you can see his brooch created after these painting. Gio Ponti was fascinated with simple geometric faces in his silverware objects made for Lino Sabatini, almost in the same years as Ernst.

Creative intensions of both were born from total different contexts. But both have very similar feeling and visual qualities.

Max Ernst, Chéri bibi, 1973
Max Ernst, Chéri bibi, 1973
Max Ernst, Tête Triangle brooch
Max Ernst, Tête Triangle brooch
Gio Ponti, Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Ex voto for the Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978
Gio Ponti, Ex voto for the Devil mask for Lino Sabattini, 1978

Fascination of the human face in the work of two big masters of the last century.

Surrealist Max Ernst (1891 – 1976) and designer and architect Gio Ponti (1891 - 1979) represent most important persons in their disciplines. Both were born in the same year of 1891 and both lived almost the same amount of years.

In their late work we can see preoccupation of the human face. Max Ernst created series of paintings of the naive yet anxious simple faces. Here you can see his brooch created after these painting. Gio Ponti was fascinated with simple geometric faces in his silverware objects made for Lino Sabatini, almost in the same years as Ernst.

Creative intensions of both were born from total different contexts. But both have very similar feeling and visual qualities.


Designed by Rust Heinz of the H. J. Heinz family and Maurice Schwartz of the Bohman & Schwartz coachbuilding company in Pasadena, California, the Phantom Corsair is the extremely unique prototype car built in 1938.

The aerodynamic low profile coupé for six people never entered the production. Futuristic design includes door without handles which were opened electrically using push-buttons located on the exterior and the instrument panel or front seating row for four people. The front part of the car`s body has also impressive design with its arrow-shaped intake openings inspired by period art-deco and streamlined movement.




We are glad that we could collaborate on preparing 25th International Biennial of Graphic Design Brno 2012.

Among my own present in curatorial committee, our OKOLO Mollino book is the part of the competition selection, as well as work of many our friends such as Pedal Project magazine and Komfort magazine or typefaces by Jan Novák, who was awarded by The Czech Centers prize for his Falster typeface. Congratulations!

Some more news from Brno later!







We are glad that we could collaborate on preparing 25th International Biennial of Graphic Design Brno 2012.

Among my own present in curatorial committee, our OKOLO Mollino book is the part of the competition selection, as well as work of many our friends such as Pedal Project magazine and Komfort magazine or typefaces by Jan Novák, who was awarded by The Czech Centers prize for his Falster typeface. Congratulations!

Some more news from Brno later!







We are glad that we could collaborate on preparing 25th International Biennial of Graphic Design Brno 2012.

Among my own present in curatorial committee, our OKOLO Mollino book is the part of the competition selection, as well as work of many our friends such as Pedal Project magazine and Komfort magazine or typefaces by Jan Novák, who was awarded by The Czech Centers prize for his Falster typeface. Congratulations!

Some more news from Brno later!

















Kenzo Tange speaking about his architecture visions for Skopje.

Last week about the building, today about the exhibition inside the Museum of Yugoslav History in Belgrade.

Unfinished Modernisation is the name of the great exhibition devoted to postwar Yugoslavian architecture and its development in the various fields of the society and history.

Unfinished Modernisations is a collaborative, long-term research platform on architecture and urban planning. It brings together partners from both institutional and non-institutional sectors from South-Eastern Europe: TrajekT, (Slovenia), Umetnostna galerija Maribor (Maribor Art Gallery) (Slovenia), the Croatian Architects’ Society and the Institute for Contemporary Architecture, Zagreb (Croatia), the Belgrade Architects Society, Belgrade (Serbia) and the Coalition for Sustainable Development, Skopje, (Macedonia). The initiators and authors of the concept of the project are Vladimir Kulić and Maroje Mrduljaš.

The exhibition includes many archive materials, plans, photos as well as films and movies. The specially commissioned contemporary photos of the existed buildings by Wolfgang Thaler are also on the show.

The exhibition continues until 2 July, 2012.















Kenzo Tange speaking about his architecture visions for Skopje.

Last week about the building, today about the exhibition inside the Museum of Yugoslav History in Belgrade.

Unfinished Modernisation is the name of the great exhibition devoted to postwar Yugoslavian architecture and its development in the various fields of the society and history.

Unfinished Modernisations is a collaborative, long-term research platform on architecture and urban planning. It brings together partners from both institutional and non-institutional sectors from South-Eastern Europe: TrajekT, (Slovenia), Umetnostna galerija Maribor (Maribor Art Gallery) (Slovenia), the Croatian Architects’ Society and the Institute for Contemporary Architecture, Zagreb (Croatia), the Belgrade Architects Society, Belgrade (Serbia) and the Coalition for Sustainable Development, Skopje, (Macedonia). The initiators and authors of the concept of the project are Vladimir Kulić and Maroje Mrduljaš.

The exhibition includes many archive materials, plans, photos as well as films and movies. The specially commissioned contemporary photos of the existed buildings by Wolfgang Thaler are also on the show.

The exhibition continues until 2 July, 2012.