Created for our The Mirror exhibition last month, this illustration documents performative mirror project called Spring Well by artist Jana Trávníčková.

Spring Well is a small natural laboratory for creating colorful mirrors using color pigments and wather. The mirror is placed on the bottom of the pure glass bowl filled with water. The pigment drops into the water and creates sediments on the surface of the mirror when the water is dried out. The result is the mirror with the colorful surface on it.

The project is the design imitation of the natural and climatic processes.


Designed for Le Mans competition only, this Alfa Romeo is a pre-war car masterpiece.

Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Le Mans Speciale was built for 1938 Le Mans race. The aerodynamic coupé was designed by Carrozzeria Touring which created one of the first racing coupé in the time when most racing cars were open. The coupé, driven by Sommer and Biondetti, led for most of the race, but tyre trouble was then followed by a dropped valve.

Today in the Alfa Romeo museum, the car is an example of a revolutionary modernist car design.


This beautiful shoe sculpture designed by Pierre Hardy for Balenciaga Spring/Summer 2013 Pre Collection caught our eyes very much.






We have found another great work from Jacques Duval-Brasseur feautered in our story about French 1970s animals decorators two days ago.

Above you can see selection of his more abstract work from the 1970s highlighting in the use of precise metals, stones, agates and other spectacular materials.






We are very fascinated by animals in design these days very much. If yesterday we have documented French 1970s animalism, now we have here true pioneer of surrealist and brutal decoration.

Jean-Charles Moreux (1889–1956) is a unique mind in the 1930s French decorative arts. His surrealist style mixing all the eclectic and classicist features with fantasy and radical modernist philosophy caught eyes of Le Corbusier, Jean Lurçat, Jacques Doucet, baron Robert Rothschild and vicomte Charles de Noailles, among others.

His unique "animal" furniture and interiors include lamps using ancient fossils as a structure, classicist table with the legs in the form of bear paws or bar made out of real elephnat leg. Bizzare and very controversial today, his work was very much adopted by surrealist movement and well as French modernists at the time.

Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Scorpion cocktail table, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Scorpion cocktail table, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Detail of Rare cocktail table with lit moth sculpture, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Detail of Rare cocktail table with lit moth sculpture, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Floor lamp, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Floor lamp, 1970s
Illuminated coffee table in the style of Jacques Duval-Brasseur, 1970s
Illuminated coffee table in the style of Jacques Duval-Brasseur, 1970s
Leon Francois Chervet, Brass sculptural coffee table, 1977
Leon Francois Chervet, Brass sculptural coffee table, 1977
Leon Francois Chervet, Dining table, 1960s
Leon Francois Chervet, Dining table, 1960s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Mirror, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Mirror, 1970s
Leon Francois Chervet, Base for coffee table
Leon Francois Chervet, Base for coffee table
Maria Pergay, Skull sconces, 1977
Maria Pergay, Skull sconces, 1977
Claude & Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Antilope table, 1974
Claude & Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Antilope table, 1974
Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne and their Cocodoll bed, 1966
Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne and their Cocodoll bed, 1966

We love animals and French decorative arts of the 1970s. Both connect in the fantastic and bizzare work of several French decorators/artists fascinated by animals forms.

Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne belong to most famous artists of this period. Their animals creations ranging from design to sculptures represent, among others, surrealist-inspired decorative work with humor as well as strange anxiety.

But not only Lalanne were interested in animals forms in that time in France. Several not so well-known designers and artists worked with animals as a main inspiration. Jacques Duval-Brasseur or Leon Francois Chervet created naturalistic furniture pieces where animals became decorative constructions made of brass, gold, agate, rare stones and other precise materials. Insects, fishes, horns, skulls and many more belong to the fantastic formal language of these specific French artists. Some animals-inspired work we can find in the work of famous Maria Pergay as well.



Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Scorpion cocktail table, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Scorpion cocktail table, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Detail of Rare cocktail table with lit moth sculpture, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Detail of Rare cocktail table with lit moth sculpture, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Floor lamp, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Floor lamp, 1970s
Illuminated coffee table in the style of Jacques Duval-Brasseur, 1970s
Illuminated coffee table in the style of Jacques Duval-Brasseur, 1970s
Leon Francois Chervet, Brass sculptural coffee table, 1977
Leon Francois Chervet, Brass sculptural coffee table, 1977
Leon Francois Chervet, Dining table, 1960s
Leon Francois Chervet, Dining table, 1960s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Mirror, 1970s
Jacques Duval-Brasseur, Mirror, 1970s
Leon Francois Chervet, Base for coffee table
Leon Francois Chervet, Base for coffee table
Maria Pergay, Skull sconces, 1977
Maria Pergay, Skull sconces, 1977
Claude & Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Antilope table, 1974
Claude & Francois-Xavier Lalanne, Antilope table, 1974
Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne and their Cocodoll bed, 1966
Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne and their Cocodoll bed, 1966

We love animals and French decorative arts of the 1970s. Both connect in the fantastic and bizzare work of several French decorators/artists fascinated by animals forms.

Claude and Francois-Xavier Lalanne belong to most famous artists of this period. Their animals creations ranging from design to sculptures represent, among others, surrealist-inspired decorative work with humor as well as strange anxiety.

But not only Lalanne were interested in animals forms in that time in France. Several not so well-known designers and artists worked with animals as a main inspiration. Jacques Duval-Brasseur or Leon Francois Chervet created naturalistic furniture pieces where animals became decorative constructions made of brass, gold, agate, rare stones and other precise materials. Insects, fishes, horns, skulls and many more belong to the fantastic formal language of these specific French artists. Some animals-inspired work we can find in the work of famous Maria Pergay as well.



Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Per Finne, Wood tools
Per Finne, Wood tools
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light

Strong collection of housewares kitchen products from eight young Norwegian designers is shown at DesignTide in Tokyo until 4 November.

Beautifully formed and executed, all the products balance between traditional and contemporary modern lifestyle. Smooth knifes by Petter Skogstad or Per Finne are modern take on traditional Norwegian as well as Japanese culture. Objects such as Skogstad's Tue cast iron trivet or Kristine Five Melvær's Liquid lights reinterpreting traditional still life motives in kitchen define new kitchen landscape with poetry and abstraction.

Another great products inspired by tradition and everyday life include Anderssen & Voll's Tuomatu cooking top made out of marble or Kristine Bjaadal's Siska French press coffee maker combining porcelain, cork, wood and leather.

Great selection of designers plus original creative theme have created beautiful series of user friendly products under the collective exhibition FoodWork.

Some information from designers:

As the title indicates, the topic of the project is food: storage, preparation, presen­tation, and eating. These objects spring out of simple and ordinary, yet es­sential and vital, actions that tie people together across cultural differences. The objects are designed for everyday situations in Norway – they are Norwegian. How­ever, we have been inspired by Japanese culture – or rather, by our particular understand­ing of Japanese culture. In other words: we have at­tempted to make Norwegian objects that could also be relevant to Japanese living. Our goal is to draw inspiration and knowledge from how our work is experienced in Tokyo.


Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Kristine Bjaadal, Keepsake containers
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Per Finne, Umami Santoku knife
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Cathrine Maske, Tokyo box collection containers
Per Finne, Wood tools
Per Finne, Wood tools
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Silhouette knifes
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Petter Skogstad, Tue cast iron trivet
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Good Morning moka pot
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Anderssen & Voll, Tuamotu cooking top
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Petter Skogstad, Chop Chop knife
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Bjaadal, Siska French press coffee maker
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light
Kristine Five Melvær, Liquid light

Strong collection of housewares kitchen products from eight young Norwegian designers is shown at DesignTide in Tokyo until 4 November.

Beautifully formed and executed, all the products balance between traditional and contemporary modern lifestyle. Smooth knifes by Petter Skogstad or Per Finne are modern take on traditional Norwegian as well as Japanese culture. Objects such as Skogstad's Tue cast iron trivet or Kristine Five Melvær's Liquid lights reinterpreting traditional still life motives in kitchen define new kitchen landscape with poetry and abstraction.

Another great products inspired by tradition and everyday life include Anderssen & Voll's Tuomatu cooking top made out of marble or Kristine Bjaadal's Siska French press coffee maker combining porcelain, cork, wood and leather.

Great selection of designers plus original creative theme have created beautiful series of user friendly products under the collective exhibition FoodWork.

Some information from designers:

As the title indicates, the topic of the project is food: storage, preparation, presen­tation, and eating. These objects spring out of simple and ordinary, yet es­sential and vital, actions that tie people together across cultural differences. The objects are designed for everyday situations in Norway – they are Norwegian. How­ever, we have been inspired by Japanese culture – or rather, by our particular understand­ing of Japanese culture. In other words: we have at­tempted to make Norwegian objects that could also be relevant to Japanese living. Our goal is to draw inspiration and knowledge from how our work is experienced in Tokyo.




After great two days trip to Munich we are back with unique sculptures by Italian modernist glass maker Toni Zuccheri.

Working mainly with Venini, Zuccheri has created many great glass designs including series of his flamboyant birds sculptures combining Venini glass with the brass and other materials. Both objects above, made at the end of the 1950s, highlight with their dynamic expressionist forms to create almost abstract compositions.

Rare "Hoopoe" prototype of bird from 1959 was auctioned during the Moss: Dialogues between art & design auction at Phillips de Pury & Company last month. Sold at $37,500.