Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Log rack, 1955
Mathieu Mátegot, Log rack, 1955
Mathieu Mátegot, Dedal bookshelves, 1956
Mathieu Mátegot, Dedal bookshelves, 1956
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store

We love colorful and bright neo-postmodernist work of Stockholm-based Note Studio. Their last project reminds us our favorite French modernist Mathieu Matégot (1910 - 2001).

The furniture, which Note has designed for Camper store in Malmö, Sweden, features perforated metal sheets used in the sublte constractions of the tables and shelves for the shoes display.

The same material highlights in the work of French modernist Mathieu Matégot very much. His collectible pieces from the 1950s in which we are interested for a long time, present amazing modernist sculptures as Note did for Camper store in their characteristic contemporary style. The styles return always.


Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Table, 1950s
Mathieu Mátegot, Log rack, 1955
Mathieu Mátegot, Log rack, 1955
Mathieu Mátegot, Dedal bookshelves, 1956
Mathieu Mátegot, Dedal bookshelves, 1956
Note, Furniture for Camper store
Note, Furniture for Camper store

We love colorful and bright neo-postmodernist work of Stockholm-based Note Studio. Their last project reminds us our favorite French modernist Mathieu Matégot (1910 - 2001).

The furniture, which Note has designed for Camper store in Malmö, Sweden, features perforated metal sheets used in the sublte constractions of the tables and shelves for the shoes display.

The same material highlights in the work of French modernist Mathieu Matégot very much. His collectible pieces from the 1950s in which we are interested for a long time, present amazing modernist sculptures as Note did for Camper store in their characteristic contemporary style. The styles return always.



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In Sweden, we ate very well. Some of The Swedish extraordinary products we present here now.

1.
Leksands knäckebrod has a beautiful packaging with the horse logo of the company on it. It was founded at the beggining of the 1920s by Joon Olof and Anna Olsson.

2.
Sweden's second most popular cheese, Herrgard comes in large wheels and has a few small holes. It has similar characteristics to Gouda and is pale yellow in color. Green packaging caught our eyes very well.

3.
Original Grebbestads Ansjovis fishes are on the market since 1911. Pink can featuring drawing of a fish and hides very tasty anchovy style sprats fillets

4.
Drott Kaviar and other products in the paste from Ejderns are produced since 1935.


1.
2.
3.
4.

In Sweden, we ate very well. Some of The Swedish extraordinary products we present here now.

1.
Leksands knäckebrod has a beautiful packaging with the horse logo of the company on it. It was founded at the beggining of the 1920s by Joon Olof and Anna Olsson.

2.
Sweden's second most popular cheese, Herrgard comes in large wheels and has a few small holes. It has similar characteristics to Gouda and is pale yellow in color. Green packaging caught our eyes very well.

3.
Original Grebbestads Ansjovis fishes are on the market since 1911. Pink can featuring drawing of a fish and hides very tasty anchovy style sprats fillets

4.
Drott Kaviar and other products in the paste from Ejderns are produced since 1935.


Its almost 2 years old news, but we like it very much. Italian brand La Sportiva has released 20th anniversary model of Mythos climbing shoes in 2011.

Inspired by vintage aesthetic, the shoes celebrates born of the original mythos shoes in 1991. Only 1991 pairs were produces hand-made in the Italian factory.


Its almost 2 years old news, but we like it very much. Italian brand La Sportiva has released 20th anniversary model of Mythos climbing shoes in 2011.

Inspired by vintage aesthetic, the shoes celebrates born of the original mythos shoes in 1991. Only 1991 pairs were produces hand-made in the Italian factory.



Jean Boris Lacroix (1902–1984) is familiar for experts of the mid-century French design. For wider audience, his name remains still forgotten.

This 1953 floor lamp manufactured by Robert Caillat is, among others, his finest piece of lighting design, which was his speciality during the 1930s and 1950s. Unique elegant lines of his delicate lightning is visible in the use of curved rod fit tightly to the base and shade of the lamp. Red and white floor light is the masterpiece of French modernist design.

Next time about Lacroix amazing Dog-shaped lamps.











We have collaborated on preparing The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon. Inside this exhibition catalogue you can find several texts on history and today design scene in Central Europe.

Curated by Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and other several co-curators, The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon in Israel explores contemporary as well as historical design from Central Europe in common themes and contexts.

Common Roots exhibition, which is now on display in both galleries of Design Museum Holon, built by designer and architect Ron Arad three years ago, try to document nature of Central European design scene and find contexts and similarities between 10 participating countries. The fact that the geo-political term of Central Europe is not so easy to define, plays important role in the selection of participating countries. In the installation you can find "typical" central European countries such as Czech republic, Slovakia, Poland or Hungary, but also more north situated countries such as Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania or at the other hand more eastern countries, Romania, Croatia and Slovenia. At the end, the strongest criterions in the selection were the fact that all the countries from the area have collective modern history regarding to former eastern bloc and political development. Also all the countries entered European Union in 2004 or 2007. "At the same time, despite their differences, Central European countries belong to a clearly defined region shaped by shared historical and cultural experiences. From this perspective, the term Central European design may be used independently of political, national, or other divisions Yet what exactly are the borders of this design world, and what criteria may be used to define it?", explains process of selection of countries Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka.

The exhibition is divided not only by countries, but also by several themes common for all the countries. Themes of Lasting Tradition, Folk Attraction, New Elegance, New Democracy or Ironic Joke represent more or less common roots of the designers working in the Central Europe with the collective historical and political context. Most of the exhibits present more experimental and self-initiated forms of product, interior or furniture design.

The highlights include consistent work of Czech designers such as Maxim Velčovský and his ironic porcelain stuff created for studio Qubus around the years 2002 and 2005. His Ornament and Crime porcelain bust showing Lenin head covering with the traditional Czech decorative pattern is an emblematic for the post-communist trauma and critical nostalgia which is still actual in the landscape of Central or Eastern Europe. Another Czech designers such as Martin Žampach, Olgoj Chorchoj, Lucie Koldová, Jan Čapek or Klára Šumová have globalized Czech design with the internationally influencing work done in the last 10 years.

The biggest national section of the exhibition comes from Poland, where Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and Klara Czerniewska found diverse works from globally well-known Oskar Zieta and his experimental metal furniture to the craft-based products by Beza Projekt, Malafor or Matylda Krzykowski and many more. Craft and local folk tradition play important role in the work of designers from Estonia, Hungary, Romania as well as other countries. Estonian Rijada studio shows its wicker work, such as Duck Toy, or Hungarian A+Z Design presents their Gypsy collection inspired by nomadic life and folk tradition of Gypsies. Most of the exhibited work is strongly associated with the traditions and possibilities of the local production.












We have collaborated on preparing The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon. Inside this exhibition catalogue you can find several texts on history and today design scene in Central Europe.

Curated by Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and other several co-curators, The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon in Israel explores contemporary as well as historical design from Central Europe in common themes and contexts.

Common Roots exhibition, which is now on display in both galleries of Design Museum Holon, built by designer and architect Ron Arad three years ago, try to document nature of Central European design scene and find contexts and similarities between 10 participating countries. The fact that the geo-political term of Central Europe is not so easy to define, plays important role in the selection of participating countries. In the installation you can find "typical" central European countries such as Czech republic, Slovakia, Poland or Hungary, but also more north situated countries such as Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania or at the other hand more eastern countries, Romania, Croatia and Slovenia. At the end, the strongest criterions in the selection were the fact that all the countries from the area have collective modern history regarding to former eastern bloc and political development. Also all the countries entered European Union in 2004 or 2007. "At the same time, despite their differences, Central European countries belong to a clearly defined region shaped by shared historical and cultural experiences. From this perspective, the term Central European design may be used independently of political, national, or other divisions Yet what exactly are the borders of this design world, and what criteria may be used to define it?", explains process of selection of countries Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka.

The exhibition is divided not only by countries, but also by several themes common for all the countries. Themes of Lasting Tradition, Folk Attraction, New Elegance, New Democracy or Ironic Joke represent more or less common roots of the designers working in the Central Europe with the collective historical and political context. Most of the exhibits present more experimental and self-initiated forms of product, interior or furniture design.

The highlights include consistent work of Czech designers such as Maxim Velčovský and his ironic porcelain stuff created for studio Qubus around the years 2002 and 2005. His Ornament and Crime porcelain bust showing Lenin head covering with the traditional Czech decorative pattern is an emblematic for the post-communist trauma and critical nostalgia which is still actual in the landscape of Central or Eastern Europe. Another Czech designers such as Martin Žampach, Olgoj Chorchoj, Lucie Koldová, Jan Čapek or Klára Šumová have globalized Czech design with the internationally influencing work done in the last 10 years.

The biggest national section of the exhibition comes from Poland, where Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and Klara Czerniewska found diverse works from globally well-known Oskar Zieta and his experimental metal furniture to the craft-based products by Beza Projekt, Malafor or Matylda Krzykowski and many more. Craft and local folk tradition play important role in the work of designers from Estonia, Hungary, Romania as well as other countries. Estonian Rijada studio shows its wicker work, such as Duck Toy, or Hungarian A+Z Design presents their Gypsy collection inspired by nomadic life and folk tradition of Gypsies. Most of the exhibited work is strongly associated with the traditions and possibilities of the local production.












We have collaborated on preparing The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon. Inside this exhibition catalogue you can find several texts on history and today design scene in Central Europe.

Curated by Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and other several co-curators, The Common Roots: Design Map of Central Europe exhibition at Design Museum Holon in Israel explores contemporary as well as historical design from Central Europe in common themes and contexts.

Common Roots exhibition, which is now on display in both galleries of Design Museum Holon, built by designer and architect Ron Arad three years ago, try to document nature of Central European design scene and find contexts and similarities between 10 participating countries. The fact that the geo-political term of Central Europe is not so easy to define, plays important role in the selection of participating countries. In the installation you can find "typical" central European countries such as Czech republic, Slovakia, Poland or Hungary, but also more north situated countries such as Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania or at the other hand more eastern countries, Romania, Croatia and Slovenia. At the end, the strongest criterions in the selection were the fact that all the countries from the area have collective modern history regarding to former eastern bloc and political development. Also all the countries entered European Union in 2004 or 2007. "At the same time, despite their differences, Central European countries belong to a clearly defined region shaped by shared historical and cultural experiences. From this perspective, the term Central European design may be used independently of political, national, or other divisions Yet what exactly are the borders of this design world, and what criteria may be used to define it?", explains process of selection of countries Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka.

The exhibition is divided not only by countries, but also by several themes common for all the countries. Themes of Lasting Tradition, Folk Attraction, New Elegance, New Democracy or Ironic Joke represent more or less common roots of the designers working in the Central Europe with the collective historical and political context. Most of the exhibits present more experimental and self-initiated forms of product, interior or furniture design.

The highlights include consistent work of Czech designers such as Maxim Velčovský and his ironic porcelain stuff created for studio Qubus around the years 2002 and 2005. His Ornament and Crime porcelain bust showing Lenin head covering with the traditional Czech decorative pattern is an emblematic for the post-communist trauma and critical nostalgia which is still actual in the landscape of Central or Eastern Europe. Another Czech designers such as Martin Žampach, Olgoj Chorchoj, Lucie Koldová, Jan Čapek or Klára Šumová have globalized Czech design with the internationally influencing work done in the last 10 years.

The biggest national section of the exhibition comes from Poland, where Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka and Klara Czerniewska found diverse works from globally well-known Oskar Zieta and his experimental metal furniture to the craft-based products by Beza Projekt, Malafor or Matylda Krzykowski and many more. Craft and local folk tradition play important role in the work of designers from Estonia, Hungary, Romania as well as other countries. Estonian Rijada studio shows its wicker work, such as Duck Toy, or Hungarian A+Z Design presents their Gypsy collection inspired by nomadic life and folk tradition of Gypsies. Most of the exhibited work is strongly associated with the traditions and possibilities of the local production.