Buildings of Industrial trade school and College of art and design in Basel present the finest example of Swiss modernism.

Designed in 1961 by Hermann Baur, the school is formed by different buildings grouped around the central courtyard with the sculpture by Jean Arp in the center. The most striking part of the structure includes Maurer hall with geometrically constructed concrete shell creating two side walls and roof. Back and front walls are made out of floor to ceiling glass panels.








Buildings of Industrial trade school and College of art and design in Basel present the finest example of Swiss modernism.

Designed in 1961 by Hermann Baur, the school is formed by different buildings grouped around the central courtyard with the sculpture by Jean Arp in the center. The most striking part of the structure includes Maurer hall with geometrically constructed concrete shell creating two side walls and roof. Back and front walls are made out of floor to ceiling glass panels.





New project is coming soon. We preview our new Open and Drink! exhibition with behind the scene report about specially commissioned Act bottle opener by our favorite Prague-based deForm studio.

We open our new studio and gallery in Prague this August by exhibition of bottle openers including this one by deForm design studio. Jakub Pollág and Václav Mlynář have designed very simple form made out of bent steel rods. Studio has created opener by the most economical and practical way. Two versions of Act are only composed of a metal wire which was bent in three locations and welded at two points. This creates a fundamental minimalist form that is cheap to produce and result in very sturdily.

See some photos from the production above. More info about the exhibition coming very soon.





New project is coming soon. We preview our new Open and Drink! exhibition with behind the scene report about specially commissioned Act bottle opener by our favorite Prague-based deForm studio.

We open our new studio and gallery in Prague this August by exhibition of bottle openers including this one by deForm design studio. Jakub Pollág and Václav Mlynář have designed very simple form made out of bent steel rods. Studio has created opener by the most economical and practical way. Two versions of Act are only composed of a metal wire which was bent in three locations and welded at two points. This creates a fundamental minimalist form that is cheap to produce and result in very sturdily.

See some photos from the production above. More info about the exhibition coming very soon.








We have just discovered some spectacular decorative lightning by French designer Philippe Jean.

Designed during the 1970s, his abstract monumental, as well as figurative, lightning is nice example of French decorative arts of the pop theatrical style of the decade.



Designed by American garden architect and modernist pioneer Fletcher Steele (1885 - 1971), these amazing steps are modernist landscape masterpiece.

Called Blue Steps, Steele designed it at Naumkeag, large estate in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, USA, in 1925, where he worked between the 1920s and late 1950s. Naumkeag was designed by noted architect Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White in 1885 as the summer estate for Joseph Hodges Choate, a prominent New York City attorney and American ambassador to England from 1899 to 1905, and then his daughter Mabel.

Steele designed Blue Steps inspired by classic Renaissance, as well as modernist movement from France. The result is striking landscape structure with blue-painted concrete arches and elegant art-deco style railings.







Our favorite French and Barcelona-based designer Sébastian Cordoleani presented his research on paper and Tyvek structures at Gallery Tator in Lyon last month.

Called Hélice, the project is based on research of simple cut paper and Tyvek structures which can be used as forms for lightning and other useful objects. We love Sébastien's natural approach for creating objects made out of ordinary materials presenting them in very inspiring and surprising forms. Hélice is exactly that case.

Andreas Christen, Swiss stacking bed, 1960 and Gino Sarfatti, 1073 floor light for Arteluce, 1956
Andreas Christen, Swiss stacking bed, 1960 and Gino Sarfatti, 1073 floor light for Arteluce, 1956
Marcel Wanders, Knotted armchair for Cappellini, 1996
Marcel Wanders, Knotted armchair for Cappellini, 1996
Herbert Hirche, Barwagen for Holzäpfel, 1956
Herbert Hirche, Barwagen for Holzäpfel, 1956
Jasper Morrison, Ply chair, 1988
Jasper Morrison, Ply chair, 1988
Mario Bellini, Modular coffee table for B&B Italia, 1970
Mario Bellini, Modular coffee table for B&B Italia, 1970
Erik Magnussen, Paustian chair, 1989
Erik Magnussen, Paustian chair, 1989
Charlotte Perriand, Side chairs, 1947
Charlotte Perriand, Side chairs, 1947
Konstantin Grcic, Chair One for Magis, 2004
Konstantin Grcic, Chair One for Magis, 2004

Earlier this month we have visited Apple Design gallery in Berlin. Current exhibition shows simple and minimalist design from the past as well as present.

Curated by owner of the gallery, Tilmann Appel, Reduce to the Max exhibition presents selection of some of the famous as well as not so well known designs from history and present. We bring you few examples worth to know.




We are intrigued by another toy animals collection by one of the ECAL students.

It is very interesting that many students, as well as teachers, created toy animal figurines in the past years at ECAL. After Adrien Rovero and his Skinni collection, Bertille Laguet and his Safari collection, Animal Growth collection by Eleonora Castellarin and Moises Hernandez, there are sea animals series designed by Leon Laskowski at the Bachelor industrial design course led by Luc Bergeron. Made out of plastic sheets, the collection includes elegantly formed shark, whale, octopus, manta and others. Nice work!





We have new pictures of our wood airplane models including Supermarine S.6B with Rolls Royce engine designed by Reginald Joseph Mitchell was the fastest airplane in the Schneider cup with speed of 547 km/h. The last one, Savoia-Marchetti S.65 with two propellers was developed in 1929, but never entered the race due to technical problems.

Called Schneider cup, the race is the most famous airplanes race in the history. Specifically created for seaplanes only, Schneider cup was founded by financier, pilot of the baloon and airplane enthusiast Jacques Schneider (1879–1928) in 1911 as a platform for technical development of the seaplanes, which were predicted as airplanes of the future. Eleven races were held during 1913 - 1931 in the USA, Italy, United Kingdom and France. There were pilots from these four seaplanes superpowers only, who competed for the main prize, the sculpture of a girl with wings on the sea level. In 1927, 1929 and 1931, the race was won by English pilots on Supermarine S.6B airplane, so the prize remained in the UK for all the time. Today, you can see it at the London Science Museum.