Inspired by baroque, rococo as well as mannerist wonder cabinets, designer and decorator Pierre Delbee created many spectacular furniture pieces and interiors for celebrated French company Maison Jansen during the 1950s and 1960s.

Delbee was active as a director of the famous decorators firm active in Paris and founded in 1880 by Dutch-born Jean-Henri Jansen. Opulent aristocracy style of Maison Jansen had continued further to the 20th century, when Stéphane Boudin took over the company during the 1920s. Under Boudin's leadership, Maison Jansen provided services to the royal families of Belgium, Iran, and Serbia; Elsie de Wolfe, and Lady Olive Baillie's Leeds Castle in Kent, England and many others.

Delbee connected decoration with modernist forms and created his own decadent version of modernist historicism as we can see in the interior of his apartment in Paris including incredible inlaid doors and cabinets made of ebony and ivory, each with the surrealistic take on an architectural theme or a arabesque table with the motive of sea shells.












A collaboration between Swedish lighting brand Wästberg and German designer Dirk Winkel results in an innovative technical table lamp.

w127 is made from a fibreglass-reinforced bioplastic containing 60% biologically sourced material, which is castor oil, taken from the castor plant which does not compete with worldwide food production due to different agricultural requirements. "When I started thinking about the design, I had the desire to challenge the perception and the common preconceptions of a material that is normally known to people just as ‘plastics’. I knew that I would like to go further than what’s the norm not only in terms of function and the look, but about the feel and tactility of the material as well," said designer about his purpose to make plastic more friendly to use and haptic without any surface coating.

Beautifully designed catalogue from Wästberg documents whole process of this collaboration.













In Liège, Belgium, we have visited two extraordinary examples of the mid-century modernism.

Belgian modern architecture is full of surprises for us. Names of modernist masters like Lucien Engels, Willy van der Meeren, Renaat Braem, Juliaan Lampens, Jacques Dubuis and others still remain hidden for wider international audience. But some recent articles and reports in the international renowned magazines and blogs slowly uncover the secrets of Belgian modern in last years.

Some time ago, we have visited two amazing modernist residences in the city of Liège. Strict modernist family house built in 1963 by Gruppe EGAU (Études en Groupe d'Architecture et d'Urbanisme) for one of its members Jean Mozin is the finest example of the rationalist movement. The perfect work with the steel construction, highlighting some geometric sculptural details, anticipates high-tech architecture decades before. The influence of Californian light and steel modernist constructions of Raphael Soriano, Albert Frey, Pierre Koenig and others is also evident.

On the other side, there is an organic and intuitive architecture of Jacques Gillet, architect who built very little during his career. His main project remains sculptural house he built for his brother in the forest surrounding Liège. Completed in 1967 in the collaboration with the sculptor Félix Roulin and engineer René Greisch, the structure is made out of steel wire construction and sprayed concrete shell. It creates artificial rock immersed in vegetation and becoming natural part of the landscape.



Two recent projects in design and sportswear tell us a story about technology, artificial intelligence and age-old desire to create a perfect machine.

Czech designer Jakub Berdych of Qubus Studio designed his Robot for Křehký gallery inspired by famous brothers Karel and Josef Čapek. Writer Karel Čapek is the author of the legendary play R.U.R from 1921 where in utopian ideas he imagined artificial man: Robot. Word of Robot was created by his brother Josef, Czech cubist painter who created geometrically rigid and colorful figures in his paintings during the 1920s. Berdych took inspiration from both brothers and created Robot made out of the colorful stained glass to tribute visionary of Karel Čapek as well as paintings by his brother Josef.

If Jakub Berdych plays with the meaning of Robot and utopian dreams in his satyrical sculpture, Nike creates robots in real, at least in its sportswear. One of its latest collections, Tech Hyperfuse is made out of the layers of construction to feature details like ripstop fabric, taped and bonded seams, and reverse coil zippers. It perfectly adapts to human body needs and offer benefits like lightweight construction, breathability and durability. The similarity of the colors of this jacket and Robot is purely accidental, but both projects relates to the ideas mentioned above very well.












This one-off Jaguar XK120 set up a speed record of 172 mph in 1953 in Belgium at Jabbeke Motorway.

Recently restored by JD Classics, the famed UK-based restoration firm specializing in classic Jaguars, with the technical and historical support of Norman Dewis, original driver of the speed record. The serial-produced car was updated with the transparent aerodynamic cover.

The restored car was first presented at The Quail festival in Monterrey, California.

Kevin Hughes
Kevin Hughes
Mallory Weston
Mallory Weston
Philip Eberle
Philip Eberle


Our friends from Depot Basel opened their latest exhibition project called Craft & Bling Bling - Fake.

This time, team of curators collaborated with Eindhoven-based magazine Current Obsession focused on contemporary jewellery. "We commissioned work by twelve jewellery makers reflecting on the subject of FAKE from standpoints of jewellery history, their own work mediums or contemporary art and society," said curators. The result is the installation in the form of oversized jewellery box with the exhibits inside. Current Obsession also published special Fake-themed issue.

Jewellery Makers:
Adam Grinovich, Barbara Schrobenhauser, Edgar Mosa, Florian Milker, Florian Weichsberger, He Jing, Julia Walter, Kevin Hughes, Mallory Weston, Philipp Eberle, Rainer Kaasik-Aaslav, Sophie Hanagarth

Craft & Bling Bling - Fake
Depot Basel
05. 06. - 06. 07. 2014

Attributed to Giovanni Ferrabini, Mirror, 1950s
Attributed to Giovanni Ferrabini, Mirror, 1950s
Georges Jouve, Wall-mounted coat rack with mirror, 1950s
Georges Jouve, Wall-mounted coat rack with mirror, 1950s

These two amazing mid-century mirrors we recently found in the auction catalogues of Phillips de Pury. They represent unique sculptural design works of the organic modernist design movement of the 1950s. French ceramic Georges Jouve designed coat rack with mirror and ceramic hooks. Turin-based furniture maker Giovanni Ferrabini is the unknown figure of the Italian custom interior design and his mirror represents his typical free form style using metal wires.

Photos Courtesy of Phillips de Pury



American architect Stehen Holl completed his first retail project for perfumer Frédéric Mallé in New York. His futuristic slipped disk facade with circle motive remains us the iconic store facade which was designed by experimental Hans Hollein for fashion designer Christa Metek in Vienna 1967.


Grande dame of Italian architecture and design Gae Aulenti (1927-2012) is pretty famous for her experimental 1960s and 1970s lighting design. One of her lesser known projects includes this hand-blown glass lamp/vase Giova she designed for Fontana Arte in 1964. Amazing connecting of typologies in one strong object!

Jakub inside Alexis Georgacopoulos office at ECAL.
Jakub inside Alexis Georgacopoulos office at ECAL.
With Laura Pregger at Depot Basel in Basel.
With Laura Pregger at Depot Basel in Basel.
With Dimitri Bähler and Christian Spiess in their studio in Biel
With Dimitri Bähler and Christian Spiess in their studio in Biel
Test of shooting of Alexis Georgacopoulos at ECAL.
Test of shooting of Alexis Georgacopoulos at ECAL.
Our temporary office at Lavaux Hotel.
Our temporary office at Lavaux Hotel.
Tomáš kissing by Le Corbusier at Villa Le Lac.
Tomáš kissing by Le Corbusier at Villa Le Lac.
With Patrick Moser at Villa Lec.
With Patrick Moser at Villa Lec.
Infront of BIG-GAME studio in Lausanne.
Infront of BIG-GAME studio in Lausanne.
Inside Bertille & Mathieu studio in Lausanne.
Inside Bertille & Mathieu studio in Lausanne.
With Bertille & Mathieu.
With Bertille & Mathieu.
Bertille & Mathieu.
Bertille & Mathieu.
With Tomáš Král inside his studio in Lausanne.
With Tomáš Král inside his studio in Lausanne.
At lake Geneva shore.
At lake Geneva shore.
With designer Adrien Rovero.
With designer Adrien Rovero.
Tasting fondue with Adrien Rovero.
Tasting fondue with Adrien Rovero.
During massive snowing with Adrien Rovero on the top.
During massive snowing with Adrien Rovero on the top.
Inside A.C.E workshop in Lausanne.
Inside A.C.E workshop in Lausanne.
Hard work.
Hard work.
Inside Terrazzo Project studio in Lausanne. Test the shoot.
Inside Terrazzo Project studio in Lausanne. Test the shoot.
With Daniel Grataloup and his friends inside house he built in the 1970s in Geneva.
With Daniel Grataloup and his friends inside house he built in the 1970s in Geneva.
Inside studio of Daniel Grataloup.
Inside studio of Daniel Grataloup.
La Chaux-de-Fonds.
La Chaux-de-Fonds.
Inside Maison Blanche that Le Corbusier built for his parents in La Chaux-de-Fonds in 1912.
Inside Maison Blanche that Le Corbusier built for his parents in La Chaux-de-Fonds in 1912.
Inside Vacheron Constantin workshop.
Inside Vacheron Constantin workshop.
With Camille Blin from A.C.E.
With Camille Blin from A.C.E.

There are few personal shots from our trip to Lausanne. Thanks Tomáš Souček for photos.